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5 Things to See When You Visit Austria

It’s difficult not to fall in love with Vienna and its clean, relaxed atmosphere as one of Europe’s most beautifully historic cities. I planned my trip to Vienna for late September or early October when it isn’t too chilly to enjoy wandering around the streets and the day isn’t too short. Austria is my #1 nation to visit because I’m in love with Renaissance architecture and rich history, and it’s also the home of one of the most famous artists of all time: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Arrived in Vienna in the late afternoon, I decided to discover the city’s nightlife. Vienna isn’t the most fun city at night, but all the historical buildings have a different vibe compared to the daytime. I find it more mysterious and somewhat even more magnificent due to the lighting. However, I first stopped at a vegan restaurant to have dinner and got myself a vegan lasagna, sweet potato salad, and peanut butter cake.

A full and happy tummy, let’s begin the expenditure!

1. The Hoftburg Palace

I stopped at Hofburg Palace first because it was right across from the restaurant. Because of the massive gate and gorgeous statues, it’s difficult to miss and will likely be the first thing you notice while heading to the ancient area. Plenty of people surrounded the gate and horses. The local celebrities are the local celebrities, and there are long lineups for the tour. I guess riding it would elevate the experience and make you feel more special.

2. St Stephan’s Cathedral

Then I went to check out St Stephan’s Cathedral. My jaw dropped to see how beautiful and majestic the cathedral looked against the dusk blue sky. Later at night, they would light up light to enhance the architectural features.  The Cathedral is located in the center of a large plaza surrounded by several restaurants and retailers ranging from high-end brands to souvenir shops. Additionally, when visiting here, you can’t miss climbing the 343 steps to Steffl’s Watch Room for the spectacular views and the North Tower, home to the massive Pummerin Bell. I chose to go to the North Tower as it’s recommended online that has the best view of the city and the colorful roof of the cathedral. If you’re not in the mood for stairs, an elevator is also accessible. Students can get a ticket for €5.

3. Schönbrunn Palace

I saved the Palace for the next day, so I could spend the whole morning walking in the park. Besides having the best interior design, Schönbrunn is also famous for its exotic garden with water fountains and statues. The best thing is that the garden is free and open to everyone. I planned to get there early, taking pictures before heading inside the Palace when it opens at 10 AM. There are different types of tickets, but I recommend buying the Grand Room ticket, which allows you to tour all the rooms in the Palace.

4. Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien and Maria-Theresien-Platz

Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum is housed in a magnificent building created expressly to show off the massive art collections. There are more sculptures and crafts than paintings, but the paintings here are exceptional as they are tied to Austrian history, and the themes are pretty reckless.

The Maria-Theresien-Platz stands directly in front of the Museum’s gate, with the massive monument to Empress Maria Theresa as its focal point. She is Austria’s most renowned and accomplished Empress, making several contributions and transforming Austrian society during her era.

5. Mozart’s Birthplace/Museum

On my last day in Vienna, I took the train back to Salzburg, another must-see city on the German border. If you like classical music, one of the must-see locations to see in Salzburg is the home where Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born on January 27, 1756. Highlights include the rooms once occupied by the Mozart family and a museum displaying Mozart’s numerous intriguing belongings, including the young Mozart’s violin, portraits, and original scores of his compositions. It’s been ten years since I last visited this place, but everything seems like yesterday. Nothing changes from the street, and the stores, to how the house looks. It has been preserved perfectly by the staff and the city.

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